Ankara houses the parliament, presidential palace, and governmental ministries. Besides, many universities and research institutions. Off these, Ankara University, Haceteppe University, Middle East Technical University and Bilkent University  are important institutions.

Ankara symbolizes the future of the Turkish Republic  with its modern face and national spirit  while Istanbul is a constant reminder of the past history with its royal mosques.  Ankara is formerly called  Angora, the capital and the second-largest city in Turkey. It is a thriving city located on the Central Anatolian plateau at an altitude of 842 m. Ankara has grown to a lively modern city from a small dusty Anatolian village when it served as head quarters for the Turkish war of independence after the first world war.

Ankara's significance increased markedly during the Turkish War for Independence from 1919 to 1923. The British occupied the Ottoman capital of Istanbul, and Sivas, the initial center of nationalist resistance, was too far from the front. Consequently the nationalist forces chose Ankara as a new base of operations. On 27 December 1919 the nationalist government, under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal  (1881-1938), arrived in Ankara and began the workings of government in the town's agricultural school. The nationalist parliament convened on 23 April 1920.
Such was the power and prestige of Istanbul,  however, that the decision to make Ankara the capital in October 1923 was met with considerable surprise and not a little dismay. Compared to cosmopolitan Istanbul, Ankara was distinctly unglamorous, a sleepy town, However, this shift involved important symbolism. The move to Ankara underlined the republic's break from its Ottoman legacy and the foundation of a distinctly Turkish and Anatolian nation.

Ankara's new status as the Turkish Republic's capital brought dramatic growth and development to the city. In the first years of the republic a large number of important buildings were constructed in or near what is referred to as the Old City, principally around the Ulus district. After 1930 a broader plan for the city developed, and major institutions were constructed in districts southeast of the original town center.
Planning could not control the effects of explosive population growth, however, and many districts were made up of unlicensed housing of varying quality, locally called 'gecekondu' (literally, constructed at night). Although Ankara developed no actual "downtown," the district of Kizilay generally has been considered the city's hub. The wealthier district of Cankaya also has been an important center of trade and government.
Ankara houses the parliament, presidential palace, and governmental ministries. Besides, many  universities and research institutions. Off these, Ankara University, Haceteppe University, Middle East Technical University and Bilkent University  are important institutions.
Ankara symbolizes the future of the Turkish Republic  with its modern face and national spirit while Istanbul is a constant reminder of the past history with its royal mosques. Ankara is formerly called  Angora, the capital and the second-largest city in Turkey. It is a thriving city located on the Central Anatolian plateau at an altitude of 842 m. Ankara has grown to a lively modern city from a small dusty Anatolian village when it served as head quarters for the Turkish war of independence after the first world war. Ankara general viewAtaturk Mausoleum (Anitkabir).
Ankara
anitkabir ankara
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