The Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük was first discovered in the late 1950s and excavated by James Mellaart between 1961 and 1965. The site rapidly became famous internationally due to the large size and dense occupation of the settlement, as well as the spectacular wall paintings and other art that was uncovered inside the houses.

Since 1993 an international team of archaeologists, led by Ian Hodder, has been carrying out new excavations and research, in order to shed more light on the people that inhabited the site. The works here is envisaged for many years to come.

The mound presents twelve levels of occupation of a Neolithic town which was inhabited from 7300 BC to  6100 BC, living city for 1200 years without interruption. The present day estimates predict some 10 000 souls living in Catalhoyuk. Findings show that the settlement was neither destroyed nor looted. It was unfortunate for Mellaart that he did not discover the oldest and very "first" settlement.

Since 1993 an international team of archaeologists, led by Ian Hodder, has been carrying out new excavations and research, in order to shed more light on the people that inhabited the site. The works here is envisaged for many years to come.

The mound presents twelve levels of occupation of a Neolithic town which was inhabited from 7300 BC.to  6100 BC., living city for 1200 years without interruption. The present day estimates predict some 10000 souls living in Catalhoyuk. Findings show that the settlement was neither destroyed nor looted. It was unfortunate for Mellaart that he did not discover the oldest and very "first" settlement.

It is the largest and best preserved Neolithic site found to date 7500-5700 BC.
Catalhoyuk
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